How a little open source project came to dominate big data

How a little open source project came to dominate big data!

Fortune

There are countless open source projects with crazy names in the software world today, but the vast majority of them never make it onto enterprises’ collective radar. Hadoop is an exception of pachydermic proportions.

Named after a child’s toy elephant, Hadoop is now powering big data applications at companies such as Yahoo [fortune-stock symbol=”YHOO”] and Facebook [fortune-stock symbol=”FB”]; more than half of the Fortune 50 use it, providers say.

The software’s “refreshingly unique approach to data management is transforming how companies store, process, analyze and share big data,” according to Forrester analyst Mike Gualtieri. “Forrester believes that Hadoop will become must-have infrastructure for large enterprises.”

Globally, the Hadoop market was valued at $1.5 billion in 2012; by 2020, it is expected to reach $50.2 billion.

It’s not often a grassroots open source project becomes a de facto standard in industry. So how did it happen?

‘A market that…

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Kernel 3.2+: Hide Processes From Other Normal Users!

In a multi-user system it was always possible for any user to list all running processes on the system whether or not these processes belong to the user!linuxkernel32rc6_dh_fx57

With linux kernel 3.2+ (RHEL/Centos 6.5+) there is a new added feature to give the root a full control over this issue where root will be the one who can list all running processes and all users will only list their own processes no more.

New mounting option: hidepid

The new option defines how much info about processes we want to be available for non-owners.The value of it will define the mode in mounting as follow:

hidepid=0 – The old behavior – anybody may read all world-readable /proc/PID/* files (default).

hidepid=1 – It means users may not access any /proc/ / directories, but their own. Sensitive files like cmdline, sched*, status are now protected against other users.

hidepid=2 It means hidepid=1 plus all /proc/PID/ will be invisible to other users. It compicates intruder’s task of gathering info about running processes, whether some daemon runs with elevated privileges, whether another user runs some sensitive program, whether other users run any program at all, etc.

This could be done through the command line as follow

# mount -o remount,rw,hidepid=2 /proc

Or by updating /etc/fstab

# vi /etc/fstab

proc    /proc    proc    defaults,hidepid=2     0     0

This will need # mount -a   to just re-read /etc/fstab

References:

https://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/commit/?id=0499680a42141d86417a8fbaa8c8db806bea1201